The Itinerant Poetry Library

Since May 2006, The Itinerant Poetry Librarian has been travelling the world with a library of ‘Lost & Forgotten’ poetry, installing the library & librarian and archiving the sounds, poems and poetry of the cities, peoples and countries she meets. Welcome to the project's blog . . . Our Itinerant Poetry Librarian lives wherever her library is - come join the cause!

FAQs: • Yes we carry our entire life and the library with us as we go • Yes, it is quite heavy • No, we're not mad. As Charles Simic said, 'But what if poets are not crazy?' That's the spirit boyo!

We exist to: remind people of the importance of free public libraries...subvert mainstream channels of distribution...remind people that access to knowledge should be free and not dependent upon economic wealth hierarchies... show people that poetry/art can provide answers to questions we ask of life...experiment in existing outside of 'the market' – thereby, instead, investing in social capital, social innovation and community.

We aim to make life taste better. Word.

Where have we been . . . ?

(2006) Amsterdam, Berlin, Dresden, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Munich, Paris, Barcelona, London, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Norwich, York, Antwerp, (2007-2008) San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Leipzig, (2009) Ulm, Chemnitz, Rotterdam, Huntingdon, Callander, (2010) Cork, St. Andrews . . . Where'd you like us to go? Can you help? Get in touch!

What We Are Up To Right Now . . .

Archive

Monday, 19 February 2007

What You Can Borrow . . .

In readiness for our first San Francisco Library Installation, here's a selection of what may be available to you . . .





. . . if you come to our Reading Room . . .



ABC Wan Do Tree: Collected Poems Volume 2 by Bob Cobbing, El Uel Uel U Publications, April 1978




On the Sea I Spied Him: 21 Pre-Metaphysical Poems by Andrew Tait, Global Ghostwriters, 2005




Burnt Aces And The Shangri-Las: poems by Richard Caddell, drawings by Edmund Tillotson Ceolfrith Press, 1978




Caprice 2: Literary & Visual Entertainment: Fund with Word & Pictures edited & published by Keith Seddon & Jocelyn Almond, 1980




And All Living Things Their Children by Dan Georgakas, published by BB Bks, undated




The inside of And All Living Things Their Children by Dan Georgakas, published by BB Bks, undated




O POEMS by Peter Finch, Writers Forum, November 1981




The inside of O POEMS by Peter Finch, Writers Forum, November 1981




The Rambling Sailor by Charlotte Mew, The Poetry Bookshop, 1929




The inside of The Rambling Sailor by Charlotte Mew, The Poetry Bookshop, 1929




Lubos edited by Lawrence Upton, Good Elf Publications, 1974




Ludd's Mill No.s 16/17 edited by Andrew Darling(?), 1979(?)




Backlog Barks by Ulli McCarthy, Atman, 1979




The inside of Backlog Barks by Ulli McCarthy, Atman, 1979




Mermaids parts I & II by William Sherman, Spanner, 1986







Residu 2 / Mongol Review edited by Daniel Richter / John Esam, Trigram Press, Spring 1966




I Dare You by Cathy Ryan, Tall-Lighthouse, 2006
Knee High Affairs by Michelle Green, Crocus Books / Commonword, 2006


Rising magazine No.40 edited by Tim Wells, 2006
Samurai in Manhattan and Other Poems by Yasuhiro Yotsumoto, Editura Academiei Internationale Orient-Occident, 2006


PS: Poetry Student No.1 edited by Paul Merchant, Godfrey Rust, Toby Sachs, February 1975




Quarto No.23 edited by Richard Boston, Quarto Ltd, November 1981




Spanner: The New York Spanner edited by Dick Miller & Terise Slotkin, Spanner, 1978




TVP magazine edited by Barbara Watts, Feburary 12 2002




WF100 / And Magazine No.6 edited by Bob Cobbing & John Rowan, Writers Forum, 1973

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I read the book of pre metaphysical poetry by Andrew tait 'on the sea i spied him' and I have to say it was truly awful. the worst poetry I have ever read. Extremely self indulgent and wallowing in self pity. I would certainly not recommend this to anyone and would ask people to stay well clear of this book and I would ask Mr. tait not to give up the day job!!

Anonymous said...

I've just read the same book (Andrew Tait's 'On The Sea I Spied Him') and I found it to be unique, strange, funny, touching and - above all - interesting. Not many books tick all those boxes, do they? As 'poet' actually appears to be Mr Tait's day-job, I want to echo the above comment, but in a positive way: don't give it up!

Anonymous said...

Andrew Tait says...

ONWARDS AND UPWARDS

I overheard somebody call my poetry,
'Indulgent, self-pitying doggerel' and worse,
But if we don't tell it like it is who else will?
It's my soul you're attacking when you slam my verse.

It's true there are many good things in life, but still
There's quite a bit of darkness that needs working through,
A line or two can sometimes hurry to your aid
When no one and nothing else comes to the rescue.

The wound from a tongue can slash deeper than a blade,
A cut soon heals, a verbal slight may long endure,
And then, while your angry words may injure your foe,
They tend to rebound and end up hurting you more.

It's almost a case of, 'Forgive them for they know
Not what they do', we must be thick-skinned, like old rope,
Call me an egotist or nutter, but my ditties
Are a stab at fixing humankind's lost hope.

To turn back now would involve more complexities
Than sticking with it, holding to our charted course,
Like Richard III or Macbeth after the crown,
We can't stop till we've made it home and found our source






Anonymous said...

Andrew Tait said...

ONWARDS AND UPWARDS

I overheard somebody call my poetry,
'Indulgent, self-pitying doggerel' and worse,
But if we don't tell it like it is who else will?
It's my soul you're attacking when you slam my verse.

It's true there are many good things in life, but still
There's quite a bit of darkness that needs working through,
A line or two can sometimes hurry to your aid
When no one and nothing else comes to the rescue.

The wound from a tongue can slash deeper than a blade,
A cut soon heals, a verbal slight may long endure,
And then, while your angry words may injure your foe,
They tend to rebound and end up hurting you more.

It's almost a case of, 'Forgive them for they know
Not what they do', we must be thick-skinned, like old rope,
Call me an egotist or a nutter, but my ditties
Are a stab at fixing humankind's lost hope.

To turn back now would involve more complexities
Than sticking with it, holding to our charted course,
Like Richard III or Macbeth after the crown,
We can't stop till we've made it home and found our source.